Surinam

The smallest countries of all the Guyanas (a term used for three countries – French Guyana, Guyana and Surinam), this destination may be small, obscure and heavily overshadowed by its neighbors, but it is by no means a memorable destination. Those who have dared to visit the oft-overlooked destination do live to tell this tale.

The tropical rainforests – which have always been observed but hardly ever been touched – is the main attraction of Surinam. Covering almost 80% of the geographical area, the rainforests are ideal for ecotourism, and have a well-developed system to support the same. Boating is the best way to navigate through the rainforests, which include a great collection of flora and fauna.

The capital, Paramaribo, has history that dates back to the 17th-century, and is declared by UNESCO as a heritage site. Known for its line of wooden colonial buildings that stand in a line at the waterfront, the city is home to the famous Central Market, a bazaar that has literally anything and everything – be it fresh fish or quack medicine. More modern features include modern restaurants and lively bars that are a far cry from the otherwise tranquility that the country is characterized by.

An eclectic and vibrant mix of people from various cultures, people here speak a variety of languages, including (but not limited to) English, Creole, Chinese, and of course, Dutch, which is the official language.

Some facts about Surinam:

  • Suriname’s national dish is chicken and rice.
  • Suriname is one of the world’s largest Bauxite producers.
  • Most of Suriname´s landscape consists of forests. In fact, tropical rainforests occupy 80% of said Landscape.
  • Surinam is the originator of the popular expression “no span.” The phrase, which comes from an urban Creole, means “Keep cool; don’t worry,” and is reflective of the relaxed, laid-back atmosphere.
  • The largest ethnic group in Suriname is is Hindustani. They are of Asian origin and comprise 37% of the country’s population.